Scolopsis – Various Species

Table of Contents

Arabian Monocle Bream (Scolopsis ghanam)
The Arabian Monocle Bream (Scolopsis ghanam)

Scolopsis – Various Species

In this article I try to describe the most famous Scolopsis species.

Unfortunately, there isn’t a lot of information or literature on the Scolopsis. I’ll do my best to inform you about the animals we know a little bit about…

There are currently 19 species about which we know something. I’ll now go over the four most well-known Scolopsis.

Of course, each Scolopsis was discovered at a different time and by a different group of (natural) scientists. These names and dates are also mentioned in articles about the species they discovered.

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Triggerfish – Various Species

Table of Contents

Redtooth Triggerfish
Redtooth triggerfish (Odonus niger) (46386906584).jpg – Wikimedia Commons

Triggerfish – Various Species

Worth knowing about the Triggerfish

This article is formatted differently than the others. Because the triggerfish consists of 12 genera (consisting of about 40 species), I will combine images and info per gender. There is too little information to devote a full article by gender.

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European Anchovy

European Anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus)
European Anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) – Oceana – fishsizematters.eu

Worth knowing about the European Anchovy

Taxonomy

The European Anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus)  belongs to the kingdom of animals, more specifically to the tribe Chordata. Here they are again subdivided into the class Actinopterygii, order of Clupeiformes, the family of Clupeidae, the subfamily of Engraudilae, genus Engraulis, and the species Engraulis encrasicolus.

This animal was first described in 1758 by Carl Linnaeus (a Swedish botanist, zoologist, taxonomist, and physician). He is known as the “father of modern taxonomy”.

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Alewife

Alewife
Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) – Alewife herring in Cecil County, Md. | Alewife swim against … | Flickr – by Will Parson/Chesapeake Bay Program

Worth knowing about the Alewife

Taxonomy

The Alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus)  belongs to the kingdom of animals, more specifically to the tribe Chordata. Here they are again subdivided into the class Actinopterygii, order of Clupeiformes, the family of Clupeidae, the subfamily of Alosinae, genus Alosa, and the species Alosa pseudoharengus.

This animal was first described in 1811 by Alexander Wilson (a Scottish-American poet, ornithologist, naturalist, and illustrator who was born in Paisley (Scotland)).

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Southern Stingray

Southern Stingray
Southern Stingray – by Kevin Eddy (Flickr.com/commons/)

Worth knowing about the Southern Stingray

Taxonomy

The Southern Stingray (Hypanus americanus) belongs to the kingdom of animals, more specifically to the tribe Chordata. Here they are again subdivided into the class Chondrichthyes, order of Myliobatiformes, the family of Dasyatidae, genus Dasyatis, and the species Hypanus americanus.

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Eastern Mudminnow

Eastern MudminnowEastern Mudminnow – iNaturalist – Eastern Mudminnow (Common Fish Species of Richmond National Battlefield)

Worth knowing about the Eastern Mudminnow

Taxonomy

The Eastern Mudminnow (Umbra pygmaea ) belongs to the kingdom of animals, more specifically to the tribe Chordata. Here they are again subdivided into the class Actinopterygii (ray-finned fishes), order of Esociformes (pikes and mudminnows), the family of Umbridae (mudminnows), genus Umbra, and the species Umbra pygmaea.

The “ae” at the end of Umbridae refers to the Latin for shadow and more specifically to a ghost (or phantom). These fish were so named because they like to hide in the background in shady, muddy, and dark environments.

This animal was first described in 1842 by James Ellsworth De Kay (an American zoologist).

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American Yellow Perch

American Yellow Perch
American Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) – File: Yellow Perch P2270247.jpg – Wikimedia Commons

Worth knowing about the American Yellow Perch

Taxonomy

The American Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) belongs to the kingdom of animals, more specifically to the tribe Chordata. Here they are again subdivided into the class Actinopterygii, order of Perciformes, the family of Percidae, genus Perca, and the species Perca flavescens.

This animal was first described in 1814 by Samuel Latham Mitchill (an American physician, naturalist, and politician who lived in Plandome, New York).

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American Eel

American Eel
American Eel U.S. (Owner: Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region – commons.wikimedia.org)

Worth knowing about the American Eel

Taxonomy

The American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) belongs to the kingdom of animals, more specifically to the tribe Chordata. Here they are again subdivided into the class Actinopterygii, order of Anguilliformes, the family of Anguillidae, genus Anguilla, and the species Anguilla rostrata.

This animal was first described in 1817 by Lesueur (a French naturalist, artist, and explorer).

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Common Bleak

Common Bleak
Common Bleak (Owner: Viridiflavus – commons.wikimedia.org)

Worth knowing about the Common Bleak

Taxonomy

The Common Bleak (Alburnus alburnus) belongs to the kingdom of animals, more specifically to the tribe Chordata. Here they are again subdivided into the class Actinopterygii, order of Cypriniformes, the family of Cyprinidae, subfamily Leuciscinae, genus Alburnus, and the species Alburnus alburnus.

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Alpino Grouper

Alpino Grouper (Epinephelus fasciatus)
Alpino Grouper (Epinephelus fasciatus)

Worth knowing about the Alpino Grouper

The Alpino Grouper belongs to the realm of the ‘Animalia’ (animals), more specifically to the tribe of the ‘Chordata’ (Chorda animals). This fish is a ray-finned (Actinopterygii) in the order of the ‘Perciformes’. So their family is the bass (or sea bass) with the name ‘Serranidae’.

Groupers have 2 types of genera: ‘Epinephelus’ and ‘Mycteropcera’. The alpino grouper belongs to the genus ‘Epinephelus’.

In 1775, the blacktip grouper was described as ‘Perca fasciata’, by the Finnish explorer Peter Forsskål (1732-1763). In 1793 the name was changed to ‘Epinephelus fasciatus’ by the German naturalist Marcus Elieser Bloch (1723–1799).

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