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Fishing Bait – Preface

First and foremost: what is bait and what is the lure? Simply put, you can assume that bait mainly consists of living material (or food). This is attached to a hook, snare, trap, or net that is usually offered on-site at the fishing spot and a lure mainly serves to attract the fish while covering a large water surface. A lure usually consists of non-living material and is offered as a reward (or pleasure) if the fish can get it. Since a lure is not as inviting as live bait, it is therefore also necessary to keep the lure moving continuously using a throwing rod. With this casting rod, you can also reach and search longer distances to perhaps find a place where the fish gather. If that lure does not move, you will have to wait longer for any fish that bites. Of course, it is more satisfying for a lure angler to have the fish bite into this non-living material. The satisfaction is all the greater.

Bait types: worms, insects, shrimp, small living fish, and even ants. One must take into account which types of fish you want to catch. It is a bit of “searching”. The view and even the smell of the bait are perceived by any fish.

Meat Worms
Meat Worms
Beach Worms
Beach Worms
Earthworms
Earthworms

Lure types: spinners, jigs, plugs, spoons, flies, soft plastic balls, and spinnerbaits.

Fishing Jig
Fishing Jig
Fishing Plug
Fishing Plug
Fishing Spoon
Fishing Spoon
Fishing Soft Plastic Bait
Fishing Soft Plastic Bait
Fishing Spinner Bait
Fishing Spinner Bait
Fishing Spinner
Fishing Spinner
Fishing Flies
Fishing Flies

Fishing Bait – A word of explanation about Lures

A lure is therefore artificially designed and serves to attract the fish’s attention and more specifically by keeping it in constant motion. A stationary lure is a “dead object” because it does not give off odors and does not move. A bait, on the other hand, is alive, gives off a scent, and moves by itself. But a lure can be very attractive because of its special movement, its flashy colors, and its vibrations. One or more hooks are attached to a lure to catch the fish. In the past (and perhaps still today) lures were used to lure the fish to low tide and pierce them with a spear. Most lures are made commercially in all shapes, colors, and attached hooks. But the handymen among us can also make them themselves, such as eg. the “fishing flies”. Making it yourself is very challenging but still as satisfying when you get good results with it. Lures are thus commonly used with a fishing rod and a fishing reel. But some people simply tie the lure to a line and hold the line with their hand (s). An experienced fisherman can cast far with a lure and thus reach special places or underwater plains.

Fishing Bait – History

In ancient times (around 2000 BC) fishing rods, hooks and lines were already used, but most fishermen just used their hands to cast the line. The first hooks were made of bronze, but they were far too light and almost invisible to the fish. The Chinese were the first to make a line using silk.

From the eighth to the thirteenth century (AD), lures were made by the Nordic population. These were made of iron, bronze, copper and in few cases, a hook was sometimes soldered to a copper spoon. Then they also made a distinction according to the weather conditions, such as ice fishing or summer fishing.

From the year 1800, people started using tin minnows (little fish) that were realistically recreated. Painted rubber has even been used to make bugs and grubs. The spoons were already designed in Scandinavia in the late 1700s.

Devon Lure
Devon Lure

The very first lures to be produced in a large number were the so-called “Devon” lures. This was done by F. Angel of Exeter. The number and different lures experienced a “boom” from the middle of the 19th century. The first lures made in the US appeared in the last half of the nineteenth century. This mainly concerned metal spoons and spinners. Its producers were: Enterprise Manufacturing Company, W.D. Chapman, Julio T. Buel, and Riley Haskell. A little later (early nineteenth century) the production of modern fishing plugs was started. This was done by several firms including Heddon in Michigan and Enterprise Mfg. (Pflüger) in Ohio. Before this mass production got underway, the lures were individually made by skilled craftsmen. Mass production is then of course based on what man had made.

Methods

The fishing lure is attached to a line with a knot (improved clinch knot) or attached to a “snaps” (a safety pin-like device). The movement of the bait was done by winding the line with the help of a reel but also via jigging movements and sweeping the fish rod. It can also be done through “trolling”, where the line is pulled by a moving boat. An exception to this is fly fishing where the fisherman stands in the water and floats his lure with a line on the surface of the water where it sinks and shows the fish that it is a so-called insect.

Improved Clinch Knot
Improved Clinch Knot

Types

Today, many different materials are used to make lures. They exist in rubber, plastic, metal, wood, cork, but also in the form of feathers, animal hair, string, tinsel, and others. They can be made from non-moving parts as well as from moving parts. Sometimes lures are also combined. In any case, the intention is clearly to make a lure look like prey to the fish. But some have also been specially made for fish that are very fond of their territory and do not tolerate intruders. And other fish are very curious or extremely aggressive. Most lures are designed to resemble some insect that is injured or dying and therefore easy prey.

Above I have already shown some standard types of lures. Here are some more special variations on it:

Snagless in-line spinner
Snagless in-line spinner
Top-water lure
Top-water lure
Copper Fishing Spoons
Copper Fishing Spoons
Surface Popper Red
Surface Popper Red

Daisy Chain

And then you have the “Daisy Chain”. This consists of a “chain” of artificial lures without hooks and aims to simulate a school of fish for a large predator. Through this daisy chain, the fish is lured up to the stern of the boat into the lure “spread” which does consist of lures with a hook. The lures are made from jets, plastic squids, cedar plugs, and other soft and/or hard plastic lures.

Finally

So there are countless lures and the fisherman does indeed need a lot of work to find the right one. This is also personal: one person agrees while another rejects it completely. So: a lot of work to be done. But once the right one has been found, success is assured! Let’s get started fishermen and wish you a good catch!


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